FANDOS Guillermo's profile
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FANDOS Guillermo

  • Institute of Biochemistry and Biology, Potsdam University, Potsdam, Germany
  • Biogeography, Community ecology, Conservation biology, Dispersal & Migration, Macroecology, Population ecology, Species distributions, Statistical ecology, Theoretical ecology, Zoology

Recommendations:  0

Review:  1

Educational and work
I am a spatial ecologist and conservation scientist with a broad interest in the ecological processes that drive the distribution and abundance of animal populations in space and time. As a mix between a field biologist and a data geek, I am an avid R user, who enjoys working with large datasets (both researcher-collected and citizen science) while developing and/or implementing new statistical methods to answer pressing questions in spatial ecology and conservation.

Review:  1

12 Aug 2021
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A study on the role of social information sharing leading to range expansion in songbirds with large vocal repertoires: Enhancing our understanding of the Great-Tailed Grackle (Quiscalus mexicanus) alarm call

Recommended by based on reviews by Guillermo Fandos and 2 anonymous reviewers

Does the active vocabulary in Great-tailed Grackles supports their range expansion? New study will find out

Alarm calls are an important acoustic signal that can decide the life or death of an individual. Many birds are able to vary their alarm calls to provide more accurate information on e.g. urgency or even the type of a threatening predator. According to the acoustic adaptation hypothesis, the habitat plays an important role too in how acoustic patterns get transmitted. This is of particular interest for range-expanding species that will face new environmental conditions along the leading edge. One could hypothesize that the alarm call repertoire of a species could increase in newly founded ranges to incorporate new habitats and threats individuals might face. Hence selection for a larger active vocabulary might be beneficial for new colonizers. Using the Great-Tailed Grackle (Quiscalus mexicanus) as a model species, Samantha Bowser from Arizona State University and Maggie MacPherson from Louisiana State University want to find out exactly that. 

The Great-Tailed Grackle is an appropriate species given its high vocal diversity. Also, the species consists of different subspecies that show range expansions along the northern range edge yet to a varying degree. Using vocal experiments and field recordings the researchers have a high potential to understand more about the acoustic adaptation hypothesis within a range dynamic process. 

Over the course of this assessment, the authors incorporated the comments made by two reviewers into a strong revision of their research plans. With that being said, the few additional comments made by one of the initial reviewers round up the current stage this interesting research project is in. 

To this end, I can only fully recommend the revised research plan and am much looking forward to the outcomes from the author’s experiments, modeling, and field data. With the suggestions being made at such an early stage I firmly believe that the final outcome will be highly interesting not only to an ornithological readership but to every ecologist and biogeographer interested in drivers of range dynamic processes.

References

Bowser, S., MacPherson, M. (2021). A study on the role of social information sharing leading to range expansion in songbirds with large vocal repertoires: Enhancing our understanding of the Great-Tailed Grackle (Quiscalus mexicanus) alarm call. In principle recommendation by PCI Ecology. https://doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/2UFJ5. Version 3

avatar

FANDOS Guillermo

  • Institute of Biochemistry and Biology, Potsdam University, Potsdam, Germany
  • Biogeography, Community ecology, Conservation biology, Dispersal & Migration, Macroecology, Population ecology, Species distributions, Statistical ecology, Theoretical ecology, Zoology

Recommendations:  0

Review:  1

Educational and work
I am a spatial ecologist and conservation scientist with a broad interest in the ecological processes that drive the distribution and abundance of animal populations in space and time. As a mix between a field biologist and a data geek, I am an avid R user, who enjoys working with large datasets (both researcher-collected and citizen science) while developing and/or implementing new statistical methods to answer pressing questions in spatial ecology and conservation.