BARBIER Matthieu

avatar
  • Centre for Biodiversity Theory and Modelling, CNRS, Moulis, France
  • Coexistence, Community ecology, Competition, Food webs, Foraging, Interaction networks, Population ecology, Spatial ecology, Metacommunities & Metapopulations, Theoretical ecology
  • recommender

PhD in statistical physics on collective motion (kinetic theories), then successive work in Inha University on complex networks in mutualism and international trade, in Princeton University on foraging strategies in social-ecological systems (fisheries), and at CBTM in community dynamics.

My interest is developing a theoretical understanding of how collective dynamics, stability and functioning of many-agents or many-species systems differ from simplified few-agents pictures that underlie many ecological intuitions, while uncovering new forms of simplicity that can appear at the collective level.

1 recommendation

2018-09-20
article picture
PREPRINT
When higher carrying capacities lead to faster propagation
Marjorie Haond, Thibaut Morel-Journel, Eric Lombaert, Elodie Vercken, Ludovic Mailleret & Lionel Roques
https://doi.org/10.1101/307322

Recommended by Matthieu Barbier based on reviews by Yuval Zelnik and 1 anonymous reviewer
When the dispersal of the many outruns the dispersal of the few

Are biological invasions driven by a few pioneers, running ahead of their conspecifics? Or are these pioneers constantly being caught up by, and folded into, the larger flux of propagules from the established populations behind them?
In ecology and beyond, these two scenarios are known as "pulled" and "pushed" fronts, and they come with different expectations. In a pushed front, invasion speed is not just a matter of how good individuals are at dispersing and settling new locations. It becom...

More

1 review

2018-06-01
article picture
PREPRINT
Data-based, synthesis-driven: setting the agenda for computational ecology
Timothée Poisot, Richard Labrie, Erin Larson, Anastasia Rahlin
https://www.biorxiv.org/content/biorxiv/early/2018/07/09/150128.full.pdf

Recommended by Phillip P.A. Staniczenko based on reviews by Matthieu Barbier and 1 anonymous reviewer
Some thoughts on computational ecology from people who I’m sure use different passwords for each of their accounts

Are you an ecologist who uses a computer or know someone that does? Even if your research doesn’t rely heavily on advanced computational techniques, it likely hasn’t escaped your attention that computers are increasingly being used to analyse field data and make predictions about the consequences of environmental change. So before artificial intelligence and robots take over from scientists, now is great time to read about how experts think computers could make your life easier and lead to...

More