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6 records found
2018-10-16
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Impact of group management and transfer on individual sociality in Highland cattle (Bos Taurus)
Sebastian Sosa, Marie Pelé, Elise Debergue, Cedric Kuntz, Blandine Keller, Florian Robic, Flora Siegwalt-Baudin, Camille Richer, Amandine Ramos, Cédric Sueur
https://arxiv.org/abs/1805.11553v4

Recommended by Marie Charpentier based on reviews by Alecia CARTER and 1 anonymous reviewer
How empirical sciences may improve livestock welfare and help their management

Understanding how livestock management is a source of social stress and disturbances for cattle is an important question with potential applications for animal welfare programs and sustainable development. In their article, Sosa and colleagues [1] first propose to evaluate the effects of individual characteristics on dyadic social relationships and on the social dynamics of four groups of cattle. Using network analyses, the authors provide an interesting and complete picture of dyadic interactio...

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2018-10-10
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Detecting within-host interactions using genotype combination prevalence data
Samuel Alizon, Carmen LĂ­a Murall, Emma Saulnier, Mircea T Sofonea
https://doi.org/10.1101/256586

Recommended by Dustin Brisson based on reviews by Samuel Díaz Muñoz, Erick Gagne and 1 anonymous reviewer
Combining epidemiological models with statistical inference can detect parasite interactions

There are several important topics in the study of infectious diseases that have not been well explored due to technical difficulties. One such topic is pursued by Alizon et al. in “Modelling coinfections to detect within-host interactions from genotype combination prevalences” [1]. Both theory and several important examples have demonstrated that interactions among co-infecting strains can have outsized impacts on disease outcomes, transmission dynamics, and epidemiology. Unfortunately, emp...

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2018-10-02
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How optimal foragers should respond to habitat changes? On the consequences of habitat conversion.
Vincent Calcagno, Frederic Hamelin, Ludovic Mailleret, Frederic Grognard
https://doi.org/10.1101/273557

Recommended by Francois-Xavier Dechaume-Moncharmont based on reviews by Frederick Adler, Andrew Higginson and 1 anonymous reviewer
Optimal foraging in a changing world: old questions, new perspectives

Marginal value theorem (MVT) is an archetypal model discussed in every behavioural ecology textbook. Its popularity is largely explained but the fact that it is possible to solve it graphically (at least in its simplest form) with the minimal amount of equations, which is a sensible strategy for an introductory course in behavioural ecology [1]. Apart from this heuristic value, one may be tempted to disregard it as a naive toy model. After a burst of interest in the 70's and the 80's, the once v...

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2018-09-20
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When higher carrying capacities lead to faster propagation
Marjorie Haond, Thibaut Morel-Journel, Eric Lombaert, Elodie Vercken, Ludovic Mailleret & Lionel Roques
https://doi.org/10.1101/307322

Recommended by Matthieu Barbier based on reviews by Yuval Zelnik and 1 anonymous reviewer
When the dispersal of the many outruns the dispersal of the few

Are biological invasions driven by a few pioneers, running ahead of their conspecifics? Or are these pioneers constantly being caught up by, and folded into, the larger flux of propagules from the established populations behind them?
In ecology and beyond, these two scenarios are known as "pulled" and "pushed" fronts, and they come with different expectations. In a pushed front, invasion speed is not just a matter of how good individuals are at dispersing and settling new locations. It becom...

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2018-06-10
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A reply to “Ranging Behavior Drives Parasite Richness: A More Parsimonious Hypothesis”
Charpentier MJE, Kappeler PM
https://arxiv.org/pdf/1805.08151.pdf

Recommended by CĂ©dric Sueur based on reviews by 2 anonymous reviewers
Does elevated parasite richness in the environment affect daily path length of animals or is it the converse? An answer bringing some new elements of discussion

In 2015, Brockmeyer et al. [1] suggested that mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) may accept additional ranging costs to avoid heavily parasitized areas. Following this paper, Bicca-Marques and Calegaro-Marques [2] questioned this interpretation and presented other hypotheses. To summarize, whilst Brockmeyer et al. [1] proposed that elevated daily path length may be a consequence of elevated parasite richness, Bicca-Marques and Calegaro-Marques [2] viewed it as a cause. In this current paper, Charpe...

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2018-06-01
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Data-based, synthesis-driven: setting the agenda for computational ecology
Timothée Poisot, Richard Labrie, Erin Larson, Anastasia Rahlin
https://www.biorxiv.org/content/biorxiv/early/2018/07/09/150128.full.pdf

Recommended by Phillip P.A. Staniczenko based on reviews by Matthieu Barbier and 1 anonymous reviewer
Some thoughts on computational ecology from people who I’m sure use different passwords for each of their accounts

Are you an ecologist who uses a computer or know someone that does? Even if your research doesn’t rely heavily on advanced computational techniques, it likely hasn’t escaped your attention that computers are increasingly being used to analyse field data and make predictions about the consequences of environmental change. So before artificial intelligence and robots take over from scientists, now is great time to read about how experts think computers could make your life easier and lead to...

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