29 articles found
2019-09-16
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Blood, sweat and tears: a review of non-invasive DNA sampling
Marie-Caroline Lefort, Robert H Cruickshank, Kris Descovich, Nigel J Adams, Arijana Barun, Arsalan Emami-Khoyi, Johnaton Ridden, Victoria R Smith, Rowan Sprague, Benjamin Waterhouse, Stephane Boyer
10.1101/385120

Recommended by Thomas Wilson Sappington based on reviews by 2 anonymous reviewers
Words matter: extensive misapplication of "non-invasive" in describing DNA sampling methods, and proposed clarifying terms

The ability to successfully sequence trace quantities of environmental DNA (eDNA) has provided unprecedented opportunities to use genetic analyses to elucidate animal ecology, behavior, and population structure without affecting the behavior, fitness, or welfare of the animal sampled. Hair associated with an animal track in the snow, the shed exoskeleton of an insect, or a swab of animal scat are all examples of non-invasive methods to collect eDNA. Despite the seemingly uncomplicated definition...

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2019-09-06
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Assessing metacommunity processes through signatures in spatiotemporal turnover of community composition
Franck Jabot, Fabien Laroche, Francois Massol, Florent Arthaud, Julie Crabot, Maxime Dubart, Simon Blanchet, Francois Munoz, Patrice David, Thibault Datry
10.1101/480335

Recommended by Werner Ulrich based on reviews by JoaquĂ­n Hortal and 2 anonymous reviewers
On the importance of temporal meta-community dynamics for our understanding of assembly processes

The processes that trigger community assembly are still in the centre of ecological interest. While prior work mostly focused on spatial patterns of co-occurrence within a meta-community framework [reviewed in 1, 2] recent studies also include temporal patterns of community composition [e.g. 3, 4, 5, 6]. In this preprint [7], Franck Jabot and co-workers extend they prior approaches to quasi neutral community assembly [8, 9, 10] and develop an analytical framework of spatial and temporal diversit...

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2019-09-04
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Gene expression plasticity and frontloading promote thermotolerance in Pocillopora corals
K. Brener-Raffalli, J. Vidal-Dupiol, M. Adjeroud, O. Rey, P. Romans, F. Bonhomme, M. Pratlong, A. Haguenauer, R. Pillot, L. Feuillassier, M. Claereboudt, H. Magalon, P. GĂ©lin, P. Pontarotti, D. Aurelle, G. Mitta, E. Toulza
https://doi.org/10.1101/398602

Recommended by Staffan Jacob based on reviews by Samuel Pichon, Mar Sobral and 1 anonymous reviewer
Transcriptomics of thermal stress response in corals

Climate change presents a challenge to many life forms and the resulting loss of biodiversity will critically depend on the ability of organisms to timely respond to a changing environment. Shifts in ecological parameters have repeatedly been attributed to global warming, with the effectiveness of these responses varying among species [1, 2]. Organisms do not only have to face a global increase in mean temperatures, but a complex interplay with another crucial but largely understudied aspect of ...

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2019-08-07
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Is behavioral flexibility related to foraging and social behavior in a rapidly expanding species?
Corina Logan, Luisa Bergeron, Carolyn Rowney, Kelsey McCune, Dieter Lukas
https://github.com/corinalogan/grackles/blob/master/EasyToReadFiles/g_flexforagingForReviewers.md

Recommended by Julia Astegiano and Esther Sebastián González based on reviews by Pizza Ka Yee Chow and Esther Sebastián González
Understanding geographic range expansions in human-dominated landscapes: does behavioral flexibility modulate flexibility in foraging and social behavior?

Which biological traits modulate species distribution has historically been and still is one of the core questions of the macroecology and biogeography agenda [1, 2]. As most of the Earth surface has been modified by human activities [3] understanding the strategies that allow species to inhabit human-dominated landscapes will be key to explain species geographic distribution in the Anthropocene. In this vein, Logan et al. [4] are working on a long-term and integrative project aimed to investiga...

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2019-06-20
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Sexual segregation in a highly pagophilic and sexually dimorphic marine predator
Christophe Barbraud, Karine Delord, Akiko Kato, Paco Bustamante, Yves Cherel
10.1101/472431

Recommended by Denis RĂ©ale based on reviews by Dries Bonte and 1 anonymous reviewer
Sexual segregation in a sexually dimorphic seabird: a matter of spatial scale

Sexual segregation appears in many taxa and can have important ecological, evolutionary and conservation implications. Sexual segregation can take two forms: either the two sexes specialise in different habitats but share the same area (habitat segregation), or they occupy the same habitat but form separate, unisex groups (social segregation) [1,2]. Segregation would have evolved as a way to avoid, or at least, reduce intersexual competition.
Testing whether social or habitat segregation is...

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2019-06-12
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Environmental heterogeneity drives tsetse fly population dynamics and control
Cecilia H, Arnoux S, Picault S, Dicko A, Seck MT, Sall B, Bassene M, Vreysen M, Pagabeleguem S, Bance A, Bouyer J, Ezanno P
10.1101/493650

Recommended by Benjamin Roche based on reviews by Timothée Vergne and 1 anonymous reviewer
Modeling jointly landscape complexity and environmental heterogeneity to envision new strategies for tsetse flies control

Today, understanding spatio-temporal dynamics of pathogens is pivotal to understand their transmission and controlling them. First, understanding this dynamics can reveal the ecology of their transmission [1]. Indeed, such knowledge, based on data that are quite easy to access, can shed light on transmission modes, which could rely on different animal species that can be spatially distributed in a non-uniform way [2]. This is especially true for pathogens with complex life-cycles, despite that i...

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2019-05-27
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Community size affects the signals of ecological drift and selection on biodiversity
Tadeu Siqueira, Victor S. Saito, Luis M. Bini, Adriano S. Melo, Danielle K. Petsch, Victor L. Landeiro, Kimmo T. Tolonen, Jenny Jyrkänkallio-Mikkola, Janne Soininen, Jani Heino
10.1101/515098

Recommended by Eric Harvey based on reviews by Romain Bertrand and Kevin Cazelles
Toward an empirical synthesis on the niche versus stochastic debate

As far back as Clements [1] and Gleason [2], the historical schism between deterministic and stochastic perspectives has divided ecologists. Deterministic theories tend to emphasize niche-based processes such as environmental filtering and species interactions as the main drivers of species distribution in nature, while stochastic theories mainly focus on chance colonization, random extinctions and ecological drift [3]. Although the old days when ecologists were fighting fiercely over null model...

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2019-05-22
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Sex makes them sleepy: host reproductive status induces diapause in a parasitoid population experiencing harsh winters
Tougeron K., Brodeur J., van Baaren J., Renault D. and Le Lann C.
10.1101/371385

Recommended by Adele Mennerat and Enric Frago based on reviews by Anne Duplouy and 1 anonymous reviewer
The response of interacting species to biotic seasonal cues

In temperate regions, food abundance and quality vary greatly throughout the year, and the ability of organisms to synchronise their phenology to these changes is a key determinant of their reproductive success. Successful synchronisation requires that cues are perceived prior to change, leaving time for physiological adjustments.
But what are the cues used to anticipate seasonal changes? Abiotic factors like temperature and photoperiod are known for their driving role in the phenology of a w...

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2019-05-14
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Field assessment of precocious maturation in salmon parr using ultrasound imaging
Marie Nevoux, Frédéric Marchand, Guillaume Forget, Dominique Huteau, Julien Tremblay, Jean-Pierre Destouches
10.1101/425561

Recommended by Jean-Olivier Irisson based on reviews by Hervé CAPRA and 1 anonymous reviewer
OB-GYN for salmon parrs

Population dynamics and stock assessment models are only as good as the data used to parameterise them. For Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) populations, a critical parameter may be frequency of precocious maturation. Indeed, the young males (parrs) that mature early, before leaving the river to reach the ocean, can contribute to reproduction but have much lower survival rates afterwards. The authors cite evidence of the potentially major consequences of this alternate reproductive strategy. So, ...

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2019-04-05
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Using a large-scale biodiversity monitoring dataset to test the effectiveness of protected areas at conserving North-American breeding birds
Victor Cazalis, Soumaya Belghali, Ana S.L. Rodrigues
10.1101/433037

Recommended by Paul Caplat based on reviews by Willson Gaul and 1 anonymous reviewer
Protected Areas effects on biodiversity: a test using bird data that hopefully will give ideas for much more studies to come

In the face of worldwide declines in biodiversity, evaluating the effectiveness of conservation practices is an absolute necessity. Protected Areas (PA) are a key tool for conservation, and the question “Are PA effective” has been on many a research agenda, as the introduction to this preprint will no doubt convince you. A challenge we face is that, until now, few studies have been explicitly designed to evaluate PA, and despite the rise of meta-analyses on the topic, our capacity to quantif...

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2019-04-01
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The inherent multidimensionality of temporal variability: How common and rare species shape stability patterns
Jean-François Arnoldi, Michel Loreau, Bart Haegeman
10.1101/431296

Recommended by Kevin Cazelles and Kevin Shear McCann based on reviews by Frederic Barraquand and 1 anonymous reviewer
Diversity-Stability and the Structure of Perturbations

In his 1972 paper “Will a Large Complex System Be Stable?” [1], May challenges the idea that large communities are more stable than small ones. This was the beginning of a fundamental debate that still structures an entire research area in ecology: the diversity-stability debate [2]. The most salient strength of May’s work was to use a mathematical argument to refute an idea based on the observations that simple communities are less stable than large ones. Using the formalism of dynamical...

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2019-03-28
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Direct and transgenerational effects of an experimental heat wave on early life stages in a freshwater snail
Katja Leicht, Otto Seppälä
10.1101/449777

Recommended by vincent calcagno based on reviews by Amanda Lynn Caskenette, arnaud sentis and KĂ©vin Tougeron
Escargots cooked just right: telling apart the direct and indirect effects of heat waves in freashwater snails

Amongst the many challenges and forms of environmental change that organisms face in our era of global change, climate change is perhaps one of the most straightforward and amenable to investigation. First, measurements of day-to-day temperatures are relatively feasible and accessible, and predictions regarding the expected trends in Earth surface temperature are probably some of the most reliable we have. It appears quite clear, in particular, that beyond the overall increase in average tempera...

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2019-03-26
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Does manipulating behavioral flexibility affect exploration, but not boldness, persistence, or motor diversity?
Kelsey McCune, Carolyn Rowney, Luisa Bergeron, Corina Logan
10.17605/OSF.IO/GCA5V

Recommended by Jeremy Van Cleve based on reviews by 2 anonymous reviewers
Probing behaviors correlated with behavioral flexibility

Behavioral plasticity, which is a subset of phenotypic plasticity, is an important component of foraging, defense against predators, mating, and many other behaviors. More specifically, behavioral flexibility, in this study, captures how quickly individuals adapt to new circumstances. In cases where individuals disperse to new environments, which often occurs in range expansions, behavioral flexibility is likely crucial to the chance that individuals can establish in these environments. Thus, it...

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2019-03-26
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Is behavioral flexibility manipulatable and, if so, does it improve flexibility and problem solving in a new context?
Corina Logan, Carolyn Rowney, Luisa Bergeron, Benjamin Seitz, Aaron Blaisdell, Zoe Johnson-Ulrich, Kelsey McCune
10.5281/zenodo.1303263

Recommended by Aurélie Coulon based on reviews by Maxime Dahirel and Andrea Griffin
Can context changes improve behavioral flexibility? Towards a better understanding of species adaptability to environmental changes

Behavioral flexibility is a key for species adaptation to new environments. Predicting species responses to new contexts hence requires knowledge on the amount to and conditions in which behavior can be flexible. This is what Logan and collaborators propose to assess in a series of experiments on the great-tailed grackles, in a context of rapid range expansion. This pre-registration is integrated into this large research project and concerns more specifically the manipulability of the cognitive ...

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2019-03-18
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Evaluating functional dispersal and its eco-epidemiological implications in a nest ectoparasite
Amalia Rataud, Marlène Dupraz, Céline Toty, Thomas Blanchon, Marion Vittecoq, Rémi Choquet, Karen D. McCoy
10.5281/zenodo.2592114

Recommended by Adele Mennerat based on reviews by Shelly Lachish and 1 anonymous reviewer
Limited dispersal in a vector on territorial hosts

Parasitism requires parasites and hosts to meet and is therefore conditioned by their respective dispersal abilities. While dispersal has been studied in a number of wild vertebrates (including in relation to infection risk), we still have poor knowledge of the movements of their parasites. Yet we know that many parasites, and in particular vectors transmitting pathogens from host to host, possess the ability to move actively during at least part of their lives.
So... how far does a vector go...

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2019-03-05
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Are the more flexible great-tailed grackles also better at inhibition?
Corina Logan, Kelsey McCune, Zoe Johnson-Ulrich, Luisa Bergeron, Carolyn Rowney, Benjamin Seitz, Aaron Blaisdell, Claudia Wascher
10.17605/OSF.IO/GCA5V

Recommended by Erin Vogel based on reviews by Simon Gingins and 2 anonymous reviewers
Adapting to a changing environment: advancing our understanding of the mechanisms that lead to behavioral flexibility

Behavioral flexibility is essential for organisms to adapt to an ever-changing environment. However, the mechanisms that lead to behavioral flexibility and understanding what traits makes a species better able to adapt behavior to new environments has been understudied. Logan and colleagues have proposed to use a series of experiments, using great-tailed grackles as a study species, to test four main hypotheses. These hypotheses are centered around exploring the relationship between behavioral ...

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2019-03-01
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Parasite intensity is driven by temperature in a wild bird
Adèle Mennerat, Anne Charmantier, Sylvie Hurtrez-Boussès, Philippe Perret, Marcel M Lambrechts
10.1101/323311

Recommended by Jan Hrcek based on reviews by 2 anonymous reviewers
The global change of species interactions

What kinds of studies are most needed to understand the effects of global change on nature? Two deficiencies stand out: lack of long-term studies [1] and lack of data on species interactions [2]. The paper by Mennerat and colleagues [3] is particularly valuable because it addresses both of these shortcomings. The first one is obvious. Our understanding of the impact of climate on biota improves with longer times series of observations. Mennerat et al. [3] analysed an impressive 18-year series fr...

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2019-02-21
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Photosynthesis of Laminaria digitata during the immersion and emersion periods of spring tidal cycles during hot, sunny weather
Aline Migné, Gaspard Delebecq, Dominique Davoult, Nicolas Spilmont, Dominique Menu, Marie-Andrée Janquin and François Gévaert
https://hal.sorbonne-universite.fr/hal-01827565v4

Recommended by Matthew Bracken based on reviews by 2 anonymous reviewers
Evaluating physiological responses of a kelp to environmental changes at its vulnerable equatorward range limit

Understanding processes at species’ range limits is of paramount importance in an era of global change. For example, the boreal kelp Laminaria digitata, which dominates low intertidal and shallow subtidal rocky reefs in northwestern Europe, is declining in the equatorward portion of its range [1]. In this contribution, Migné and colleagues [2] focus on L. digitata near its southern range limit on the coast of France and use a variety of techniques to paint a complete picture of the physio...

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2019-02-20
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Differential immune gene expression associated with contemporary range expansion of two invasive rodents in Senegal
Nathalie Charbonnel, Maxime Galan, Caroline Tatard, Anne Loiseau, Christophe Diagne, Ambroise Dalecky, Hugues Parrinello, Stephanie Rialle, Dany Severac and Carine Brouat
10.1101/442160

Recommended by Simon Blanchet based on reviews by Nadia Aubin-Horth and 1 anonymous reviewer
Are all the roads leading to Rome?

Identifying the factors which favour the establishment and spread of non-native species in novel environments is one of the keys to predict - and hence prevent or control - biological invasions. This includes biological factors (i.e. factors associated with the invasive species themselves), and one of the prevailing hypotheses is that some species traits may explain their impressive success to establish and spread in novel environments [1]. In animals, most research studies have focused on trait...

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2019-01-31
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Do the more flexible individuals rely more on causal cognition? Observation versus intervention in causal inference in great-tailed grackles
Aaron Blaisdell, Zoe Johnson-Ulrich, Luisa Bergeron, Carolyn Rowney, Benjamin Seitz, Kelsey McCune, Corina Logan
10.17605/OSF.IO/GCA5V

Recommended by Emanuel Alexis Fronhofer based on reviews by 2 anonymous reviewers
From cognition to range dynamics: advancing our understanding of macroecological patterns

Understanding the distribution of species on earth is one of the fundamental challenges in ecology and evolution. For a long time, this challenge has mainly been addressed from a correlative point of view with a focus on abiotic factors determining a species abiotic niche (classical bioenvelope models; [1]). It is only recently that researchers have realized that behaviour and especially plasticity in behaviour may play a central role in determining species ranges and their dynamics [e.g., 2-5]....

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2019-01-10
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Inferring macro-ecological patterns from local species' occurrences
Anna Tovo, Marco Formentin, Samir Suweis, Samuele Stivanello, Sandro Azaele, Amos Maritan
10.1101/387456

Recommended by Matthieu Barbier based on reviews by Kevin Cazelles and 1 anonymous reviewer
Upscaling the neighborhood: how to get species diversity, abundance and range distributions from local presence/absence data

How do you estimate the biodiversity of a whole community, or the distribution of abundances and ranges of its species, from presence/absence data in scattered samples?
It all starts with the collector's dilemma: if you double the number of samples, you will not get double the number of species, since you will find many of the same common species, and only a few new rare ones.
This non-additivity has prompted many ecologists to study the Species-Area Relationship. A common theoretical appr...

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2018-12-29
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The return of the trophic chain: fundamental vs realized interactions in a simple arthropod food web
Inmaculada Torres-Campos, Sara Magalhães, Jordi Moya-Laraño, Marta Montserrat
10.1101/324178

Recommended by Francis John Burdon based on reviews by Owen Petchey and 2 anonymous reviewers
From deserts to avocado orchards - understanding realized trophic interactions in communities

The late eminent ecologist Gary Polis once stated that “most catalogued food-webs are oversimplified caricatures of actual communities” and are “grossly incomplete representations of communities in terms of both diversity and trophic connections.” Not content with that damning indictment, he went further by railing that “theorists are trying to explain phenomena that do not exist” [1]. The latter critique might have been push back for Robert May´s ground-breaking but ultimately flaw...

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2018-12-14
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Recommendations to address uncertainties in environmental risk assessment using toxicokinetics-toxicodynamics models
Virgile Baudrot and Sandrine Charles
10.1101/356469

Recommended by Luis Schiesari based on reviews by Andreas Focks and 2 anonymous reviewers
Addressing uncertainty in Environmental Risk Assessment using mechanistic toxicological models coupled with Bayesian inference

Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) is a strategic conceptual framework to characterize the nature and magnitude of risks, to humans and biodiversity, of the release of chemical contaminants in the environment. Several measures have been suggested to enhance the science and application of ERA, including the identification and acknowledgment of uncertainties that potentially influence the outcome of risk assessments, and the appropriate consideration of temporal scale and its linkage to assessmen...

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2018-10-16
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Impact of group management and transfer on individual sociality in Highland cattle (Bos Taurus)
Sebastian Sosa, Marie Pelé, Elise Debergue, Cedric Kuntz, Blandine Keller, Florian Robic, Flora Siegwalt-Baudin, Camille Richer, Amandine Ramos, Cédric Sueur
https://arxiv.org/abs/1805.11553v4

Recommended by Marie Charpentier based on reviews by Alecia CARTER and 1 anonymous reviewer
How empirical sciences may improve livestock welfare and help their management

Understanding how livestock management is a source of social stress and disturbances for cattle is an important question with potential applications for animal welfare programs and sustainable development. In their article, Sosa and colleagues [1] first propose to evaluate the effects of individual characteristics on dyadic social relationships and on the social dynamics of four groups of cattle. Using network analyses, the authors provide an interesting and complete picture of dyadic interactio...

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2018-10-10
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Detecting within-host interactions using genotype combination prevalence data
Samuel Alizon, Carmen LĂ­a Murall, Emma Saulnier, Mircea T Sofonea
10.1101/256586

Recommended by Dustin Brisson based on reviews by Samuel Díaz Muñoz, Erick Gagne and 1 anonymous reviewer
Combining epidemiological models with statistical inference can detect parasite interactions

There are several important topics in the study of infectious diseases that have not been well explored due to technical difficulties. One such topic is pursued by Alizon et al. in “Modelling coinfections to detect within-host interactions from genotype combination prevalences” [1]. Both theory and several important examples have demonstrated that interactions among co-infecting strains can have outsized impacts on disease outcomes, transmission dynamics, and epidemiology. Unfortunately, emp...

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2018-10-02
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How optimal foragers should respond to habitat changes? On the consequences of habitat conversion.
Vincent Calcagno, Frederic Hamelin, Ludovic Mailleret, Frederic Grognard
10.1101/273557

Recommended by Francois-Xavier Dechaume-Moncharmont based on reviews by Frederick Adler, Andrew Higginson and 1 anonymous reviewer
Optimal foraging in a changing world: old questions, new perspectives

Marginal value theorem (MVT) is an archetypal model discussed in every behavioural ecology textbook. Its popularity is largely explained but the fact that it is possible to solve it graphically (at least in its simplest form) with the minimal amount of equations, which is a sensible strategy for an introductory course in behavioural ecology [1]. Apart from this heuristic value, one may be tempted to disregard it as a naive toy model. After a burst of interest in the 70's and the 80's, the once v...

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2018-09-20
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When higher carrying capacities lead to faster propagation
Marjorie Haond, Thibaut Morel-Journel, Eric Lombaert, Elodie Vercken, Ludovic Mailleret & Lionel Roques
10.1101/307322

Recommended by Matthieu Barbier based on reviews by Yuval Zelnik and 1 anonymous reviewer
When the dispersal of the many outruns the dispersal of the few

Are biological invasions driven by a few pioneers, running ahead of their conspecifics? Or are these pioneers constantly being caught up by, and folded into, the larger flux of propagules from the established populations behind them?
In ecology and beyond, these two scenarios are known as "pulled" and "pushed" fronts, and they come with different expectations. In a pushed front, invasion speed is not just a matter of how good individuals are at dispersing and settling new locations. It becom...

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2018-06-10
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A reply to “Ranging Behavior Drives Parasite Richness: A More Parsimonious Hypothesis”
Charpentier MJE, Kappeler PM
https://arxiv.org/abs/1805.08151v3

Recommended by CĂ©dric Sueur based on reviews by 2 anonymous reviewers
Does elevated parasite richness in the environment affect daily path length of animals or is it the converse? An answer bringing some new elements of discussion

In 2015, Brockmeyer et al. [1] suggested that mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) may accept additional ranging costs to avoid heavily parasitized areas. Following this paper, Bicca-Marques and Calegaro-Marques [2] questioned this interpretation and presented other hypotheses. To summarize, whilst Brockmeyer et al. [1] proposed that elevated daily path length may be a consequence of elevated parasite richness, Bicca-Marques and Calegaro-Marques [2] viewed it as a cause. In this current paper, Charpe...

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2018-06-01
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Data-based, synthesis-driven: setting the agenda for computational ecology
Timothée Poisot, Richard Labrie, Erin Larson, Anastasia Rahlin
10.1101/150128

Recommended by Phillip P.A. Staniczenko based on reviews by Matthieu Barbier and 1 anonymous reviewer
Some thoughts on computational ecology from people who I’m sure use different passwords for each of their accounts

Are you an ecologist who uses a computer or know someone that does? Even if your research doesn’t rely heavily on advanced computational techniques, it likely hasn’t escaped your attention that computers are increasingly being used to analyse field data and make predictions about the consequences of environmental change. So before artificial intelligence and robots take over from scientists, now is great time to read about how experts think computers could make your life easier and lead to...

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